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Brainstorm

Tuesday, October 21, 2014


I am becoming increasingly more passionate about the human brain and  how it works and  it's contribution to our overall sense of well being.  I recently discovered an interesting and helpful on line  resource that I think all

parents could benefit from.  I was drawn to the website by the opening statement " Welcome to our world wide conversation about the human mind and

the cultivation of well being".   Dr. Daniel Siegel (www.dansiegal.com) received his medical degree from Harvard University and completed his postgraduate medical education at UCLA with training in pediatrics and

child, adolescent and adult psychiatry.   Dr. Siegel is currently a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine where he is on the faculty of the Center for Culture, Brain, and Development

<http://cbd.ucla.edu/>  and the founding co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center <http://marc.ucla.edu/

He is the author of several books and the one that I am interested in is called Brainstorm - The Power  and Purpose of the Teenage Brain (all of us who are parents of

teenagers understand why a book like this would be useful!).  The book addresses how the  human brain changes between the ages of 12-24  in important, and oftentimes maddening, ways.  He acknowledges that it is no

wonder that many parents approach their child's adolescence with fear and trepidation. Dr.  Siegel suggests in the book that  if parents and teens can

work together to form a deeper understanding of the brain science behind all the tumult, they will be able to turn conflict into connection and form a deeper understanding of one another. In Brainstorm, Siegel describes how brain development impacts teenagers' behavior and relationships. He draws on important new research in the field

of interpersonal neurobiology,  and he explores ways in which understanding how the teenage brain functions can help parents make what is in fact an incredibly positive period of growth, change, and experimentation in their

children's lives less lonely and distressing on both sides of the generational divide.

He has written other books that will be useful for parents of young children, and on the website on the resources section  he has short online parenting videos on many topics like how to stop yelling at your kids, how a

better understanding of the brain can help improve parenting,  left and right brain integration in daily life, how storytelling connects both side of the brain and several others.  I've watched a couple of the clips and

they sparked some new perspectives,  questions and ideas to contemplate. As a parent that is always a good thing.  As a parent of a teenager, it is a necessary thing!

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